New York

New York
Public Computer Centers $13,917,562
New York

Low-income and limited-English households in the New York City tend to adopt broadband at less than half the rate of their counterparts in moderate and higher income households. The City of New York’s Connected Communities project proposes to upgrade and expand public computer centers in libraries, public housing facilities, recreation centers, senior centers, and community support organizations across the city, focusing on high-poverty areas such as Harlem and the South Bronx. The project plans to serve vulnerable populations in these areas by establishing programs for digital literacy and multimedia training, providing public access to new and upgraded computers and assistive technology, creating after school programs, and providing test preparation and workforce education.

Sustainable Adoption $5,962,124
New York

New York City’s transfer school students—students between the ages of 16-21 who have disengaged from high school and are not on track to graduate—face a significantly greater risk of poverty, crime, unemployment, and other challenges in life. As part of an effort to help these students develop skills necessary for graduation and a successful transition to college or a career, the City of New York’s Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications (DoITT) proposes an aggressive outreach program to serve students and their families at 43 transfer high schools through computer training, refurbished computer equipment, and Internet access subsidies. Students would receive computers and broadband access in the home after completing a 57-hour broadband training course, along with a 3-hour program for family members.

Sustainable Adoption $14,988,657

Broadband’s ability to expand educational and employment opportunities is especially meaningful for Americans who are deaf or hard of hearing, a community that faces unique challenges in education and that suffers from a rate of unemployment much higher than the national average. Communication Service for the Deaf, Inc. (CSD) intends to expand broadband adoption among people who are deaf and hard of hearing and provide them with online tools to more fully participate in the digital economy. The project proposes to employ a combination of discounted broadband service and specialized computers, technology training from an online state-of-the art support center customized to the community’s needs, public access to videophones at anchor institutions from coast to coast, and a nationwide outreach initiative. Thousands will gain online access to all the Internet has to offer, including sign language interpreters, captioned video services, and other content and functionalities designed especially to advance their educational, employment, and healthcare interests.

Infrastructure $38,938,988
New York, Pennsylvania, Vermont

The ION Upstate New York Rural Broadband Initiative proposes to build 10 new segments of fiber-optic, middle mile broadband infrastructure, serving more than 70 rural communities in upstate New York and parts of Pennsylvania and Vermont. The ION project plans to construct a 1,308-mile network to offer broadband speeds of one to 10 Gbps to serve more than 300 anchor institutions and immediately connect more than 100, including libraries, state and community colleges, state and county agencies, and health clinics. ION plans to extend its relationship with the New York State Office for Mental Health, along with the Basset Hospital and Healthcare System, to expand many of its telemedicine practices.

Sustainable Adoption $22,162,825
New York

The NYC Connected Learning project plans to provide computer training, desktop computers, educational software, and free broadband access for one year to more than 18,000 low-income sixth-graders and their families (approximately 40,000 residents total) in 100 high-need public middle schools in New York City. Of these households, the applicant anticipates that more than 12,000 will subscribe to broadband beyond the free year-long subscription period. The no